Change Can Be a Good Thing
April 25th, 2016 by Curtis Condon
There are as many ways to organize fishing gear as there are anglers. The important thing is to find a system that works best for you and use it. Generally, keep everything together, rather than storing gear throughout the house and garage. Use as many boxes and other storage containers as necessary. For fishing trips, where space often is limited, condense everything to one or two tackle boxes. Take only the essentials. Photo by iStock.com/panamsky

There are as many ways to organize fishing gear as there are anglers. The important thing is to find a system that works best for you and use it. Generally, keep everything together, rather than storing gear throughout the house and garage. Use as many boxes and other storage containers as necessary. For fishing trips, where space often is limited, condense everything to one or two tackle boxes. Take only the essentials. Photo by iStock.com/panamsky

Fishing is like anything else: If you keep doing it the same way, don’t expect a different result.

Let’s face it. We all fall victim to routine: fishing in the same places, using the same lures, doing the same things over and over.
Every once in a while, it’s beneficial to reassess how we do things and change it up when it makes sense.

Here are five tips that may offer a refreshing and rewarding change:

Reorganize your tackle box. Arrange it so you can find everything quickly. Also, remove ineffective and rarely used lures and other tackle.

Lighten up. That goes for rod, reel, line and sinker. Fishing with light gear can be more challenging, and many anglers consider it to be more satisfying as well.

Start anew. If you’re too attached to that banged up old reel or just making due with a rod that has seen its better days, take the plunge and replace it. Don’t skimp on quality. Invest in gear and tackle that will last, do its job and not fail you at a critical moment.

Don’t be afraid to experiment. Have an open mind to new tackle and new techniques, and take the time to thoroughly test them in the field before adopting or rejecting them.

Go for a change of scenery. Fight the habit of driving to the same old, tried-and-true fishing holes. Take a risk and venture into the unknown. Sure, you may get skunked a time or two, but you also might find the next great sweet spot.

Fun Fish Facts

  • Catfish have 27,000 taste buds, nearly four times as many as humans.
  • The oldest fish hook is 16,000 to 23,000 years old. The hook was found in a limestone cave in East Timor in 2011. It was discovered among evidence suggesting humans were catching fish from the open ocean as many as 42,000 years ago.

’Tis the Season for Ticks
Late spring is prime time for ticks. Minimizing contact is the best way to reduce the odds of picking up one or more of these blood-sucking hitchhikers.

Wear long pants when you might come in contact with vegetation that may harbor ticks. Tuck in pant legs to keep ticks out.

For an added measure of protection, use an insect repellent containing DEET. This is effective against ticks as well as other insect pests. Be sure to spray the lower half of pant legs and shoes for maximum effect.

Outdoors 101: A Cool Head is Your No. 1 Emergency Tool
A sense of panic can set in when you suddenly find yourself lost, injured or in some other unpleasant predicament on the water or in the wild. When panic strikes, your ability to think clearly and assess your situation is severely impaired. The most important thing you can do is stay calm. Take time to breathe, clear your thoughts and try to keep panic at bay. Then you can begin to assess your situation rationally and take steps to deal with the situation.

What Holiday is It?
May: National Barbecue Month
May 8-14: National Wildflower Week
May 15-21: National Bike Week

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