Expertise At Your Fingertips
October 25th, 2015 by Curtis Condon
There are hundreds of smartphone apps for outdoor activities. A free app developed by Mossy Oak called ScoutLook Weather Fishlog is perfect for any kind of fishing, where subtleties in temperature, wind, and solar and lunar activity can mean the difference between success and failure. Photo by Kevin Beasley

There are hundreds of smartphone apps for outdoor activities. A free app developed by Mossy Oak called ScoutLook Weather Fishlog is perfect for any kind of fishing, where subtleties in temperature, wind, and solar and lunar activity can mean the difference between success and failure.
Photo by Kevin Beasley

Not everyone owns a smartphone, but even those who don’t should appreciate the value of apps. There seems to be an app for every outdoor pursuit. They allow anybody to be an expert—or at least have access to the information of one—by packing a phone full of apps in their pocket. Here are just a few of the many useful apps for outdoor enthusiasts.

  • Navigation. There are scores of navigation apps, but Spyglass is one of the most unique and versatile. It is a GPS multitool. It uses a smartphone’s video camera to overlay a compass on what the user sees around them, similar to a fighter pilot’s heads-up display. It also performs many of the same functions of a traditional GPS unit, such as creating waypoints, calculating speed of travel and travel time to the destination. Spyglass is available for iPhone only, $3.99.
  • Knots and lashings. One of the best knot-tying apps available is Animated Knots by Grog. It features more than 150 essential knots grouped by category, such as fishing, sailing, climbing, scouting and rescue, with more than a dozen knots in each category. Each knot description includes common names, knot uses, a written explanation of how to tie them and an animated slideshow that demonstrates how to tie the knot step by step. Available for iPhone and Android, $4.99.
  • First aid. The Wilderness First Aid app provides a useful, illustrated, step-by-step first aid guide for responding to wilderness emergencies, big and small. It covers everything from blisters and bug bites to fractures and hypothermia. It also provides instructions for determining when and how to evacuate a seriously ill or injured person. Available for iPhone and Android, 99 cents.

Double the Storage Lifeof Game Meat
Air facilitates the breakdown of meat, even when it’s frozen. Meat wrapped the traditional way—in plastic wrap and freezer paper—lasts approximately one year in the freezer. By vacuum sealing your meat instead, you can double storage life to two years.

Fish Into the Wind
Bass prefer to swim with the current to conserve effort and energy. By casting into the wind, you can ambush bass before they reach you. You won’t get the distance of casting with the wind, but what you sacrifice in distance you may make up for in the number of fish you catch.

Outdoors 101:The Best Trail Food
Calories per ounce is the key to selecting the best trail food. Generally, the more calories per ounce the better.

GORP is the gold standard of trail food. This longtime favorite consists of dried fruit, nuts and candy, and contains approximately 150 calories an ounce, depending on what you include. That’s another reason why it’s the best: You can mix and match ingredients to your specific tastes.

Other calories-per-ounce favorites are macaroni and cheese, peanut butter, Snickers candy bars and breakfast pastries, such as Pop Tarts and breakfast bars.

What Day is It?
November 5, Gunpowder Day
November 17, Take a Hike Day
November 22, Go for a Ride Day

Got a Tip or a Whopper?
Send us your favorite outdoor tip, photo or story. If selected for publication in the magazine, we will send you $25 for one-time use of the item. When sending a photo, identify people and pets, and tell us the story behind the photo. Email your submission to gro.etilarurnull@ofni.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMany of Curtis Condon’s fondest memories involve outdoor adventures with friends and family, whether fishing with old school buddies, backpacking in the mountains of the Northwest with his sons, or bird watching along the coast with his wife. He feels fortunate having the opportunity to write about the outdoors and other subjects for more than 30 years.