Make Room for More Fishing Gear
January 25th, 2019 by Curtis Condon

Here are three ways to make every penny count when shopping for fishing gear: Don’t miss the preseason sales in late February and March, shop the deep-discount aisle and ask retailers to match prices of other stores. If you know exactly what you want, check out online sales. It’s not a bad way to shop. You avoid crowds and can score some awesome deals.
© iStock/JackF

It won’t be long now. Fishing retailers will start rolling out some of the biggest sales of the year later this month.
What better excuse to clean out and organize your tackle boxes, and make room for new gear.
Here are eight tips to help get you started:

  • Go through everything you have. That way you know exactly what you have and what you need.
  • Get rid of ineffective gear. Give it away, garage sale it or donate it to charity. Maybe someone else will have better luck with it.
  • Determine the best way to organize the keepers. There are two main strategies: organizing by type of tackle or organizing by fish species. The latter works well when dealing with less gear, while organizing by tackle type is preferable when managing large inventories. Or use a combination of both.
  • Everything should have a home. Plastic trays and bins with adjustable dividers are perfect for the job.
  • Use clear plastic storage containers. They provide better visibility and allow quicker access to tackle than opaque containers.
  • Keep similar tackle together. Arrange it according to type, size, shape and color.
  • Keep soft baits in original packaging. If already opened, store them according to type and color in plastic bags to avoid a mess.
  • Label everything. Use removable labels rather than writing directly on the containers. Add color coding to locate gear even faster.

Outdoor 101: First Aid in a Bottle
Carrying a first-aid kit is a good idea, even on day trips. To make a pocket-size version, fill a prescription bottle or similar container with a few of the essentials, such as antiseptic wipes, antibacterial cream, adhesive bandages, pain relievers and small tweezers.

Tea is Not Just for Drinking
That’s what my great-aunt used to tell me when I was a kid. She was a serious tea drinker—very British, though she had emigrated to Canada after the blitz, as she called the bombings of London during World War II.
Auntie said one of tea’s other uses is deodorizing shoes. I had an opportunity to test that claim on a sweaty pair of ski boots after a day on the slopes. I put a couple of tea bags in each boot overnight. It worked wonders. I’ve been a believer ever since.

Not surprisingly, tea is also great for soaking tired, stinky feet. I’ve learned of other uses, too, such as soothing a sunburn, bug bites or a rash.

Not to mention it’s marvelous with biscuits and jam. Quite.

What Day is It?
February 3, Feed the Birds Day
February 5, National Weatherman’s Day
February 22, Walking the Dog Day

Got a Tip or a Whopper?
Send us your favorite outdoor tip, photo or story. If selected for publication, we will send you $25 for one-time use. Email your submission to gro.etilarurnull@ofni.

Many of Curtis Condon’s fondest memories involve outdoor adventures with friends and family, whether fishing with old school buddies, backpacking in the mountains of the Northwest with his sons, or bird watching along the Gulf Coast with his wife. He feels fortunate having the opportunity to write about the outdoors and other subjects for more than 30 years.